Oxford Study Attacks Regenerative Agriculture — Monsanto Ally?

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Author: John W. Roulac | Published: October 29, 2017

The British Empire has schooled the world in colonialism, with resulting devastation in India, Africa, and the Americas. While the colonies’ revolutionary army was successful in defeating the British redcoats more than 240 years ago, today we face a new kind of threat from the United Kingdom.

A University of Oxford think tank, the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN), has come out with a report, “Grazed and Confused,” that likens 100-percent-grass-fed beef to that produced on a 10,000-cow confined animal feedlot operation (CAFO) like Harris Ranch on Interstate 5 in Central California — calling them basically the same in climate impacts.

Think, for a moment, how absurd that is. One has to wonder why this Oxford think tank is being so deferential to Monsanto and the GMO/fertilizer industry, which profits via the planet-killing, health-destroying CAFO model.

The Monsanto Connection to Oxford University

It seems that Monsanto has deep and enduring connection to the University of Oxford (UO). Monsanto has paid out to UO through various business ventures more than $50M pounds ($75M US).

Also, Oxford University Press has published a flattering book, written by Robert Paarlberg, full of Monsanto puffery: Food Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know.

In 2006 The Guardian reported that UO professor and Oxford resident Dr. Richard Droll wrote and testified that Monsanto chemicals did not cause cancer, while “ . . . was receiving a consultancy fee of $1,500 a day in the mid-1980s from Monsanto, then a major chemical company and now better known for its GM crops business.”

Oxford University has advertised a Monsanto Senior Research Fellowship.

The search function on the Food Climate Research Network website produces only one link for Monsanto (a very favorable article on CRISPR, a new GMO 2.0 technique). How could a supposedly climate independent food research group not be writing about the high impacts of the agrochemical sector within the areas — health, food access, environment, climate change — in which it claims expertise?

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