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Cover Crops May Be Used to Mitigate and Adapt to Climate Change

Cover crops long have been touted for their ability to reduce erosion, fix atmospheric nitrogen, reduce nitrogen leaching and improve soil health, but they also may play an important role in mitigating the effects of climate change on agriculture, according to a Penn State researcher.

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Make Our Soil Great Again

Restoring fertility to degraded agricultural soils is one of humanity’s most pressing and under-recognized natural infrastructure projects, and would pay dividends for generations to come. It’s time for a moonshot-like effort to restore the root of all prosperous civilizations: Our soil, the skin of the Earth.

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No-till at Woven Roots Farm: An Interview With Co-owner Jen Salinetti

Jen Salinetti is a no-till vegetable farmer in Massachusetts. Jen feels by not disturbing the soil on their farm with tillage, they have a considerable positive impact on carbon sequestration on their land. They have also experienced a significant increase in quality and yields which has enabled them to create a viable business on a small amount of land.

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Local Farmers Sowing Seeds of Carbon Farming

There is a climate-change solution that can take root at the local level which can actually reverse climate change by at least 40 percent. By changing the way we grow food, we can actually draw down carbon from the atmosphere and put it to good use where it belongs: In the soil. Call it carbon farming.