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International Study Indicates Ways to Mitigate the Effects of Climate Change on Agriculture

Extreme weather events are going to be more frequent and longer lasting, and farmers will have to adapt, finding new forms of agricultural and agroforestry management.

Kernza and the Promise of Perennial Agriculture

Kernza is an intermediate wheatgrass developed by The Land Institute, a non-profit organization in Salina, Kas., and is shown to have a positive impact on soil health, carbon sequestration and water retention.

UK to Set Goal of Restoring Soil Health by 2030

The upcoming agricultural bill to be published later this year will include a specific segment on soil health, and is likely to set a nationwide goal of restoring degraded soils across the country by 2030. The specifics of what that means are still being ironed out, but the bill is likely to include soil health targets for soil health for farmers, as well as incentives for soil-friendly practices like crop rotation, cover crops, and the planting of hedgerows, wind breaks and other natural guards against erosion.

Regenerative Organic Certification Wants To Be The Ethical Standard To Rule Them All

The standard, called Regenerative Organic Certification, can apply to any product made with agricultural ingredients. It requires that farmers produce those ingredients via practices that follow rigorous criteria: Increase soil organic matter over time and sequester atmospheric carbon in that soil; improve animal welfare on farms; provide economic stability and fair labor conditions for workers; create environmentally and economically resilient production ecosystems and communities.

EPIC Receives Savory Institute’s Frontier Founder Award

Founding brand partner of Land to Market™ program recognized for commitment to verified regenerative sourcing.

How to Change the Climate Story: Paul Hawken

To generate effective, universal action that will solve the problem of climate change, the global community needs to abandon the “wussy” language of climate mitigation and rethink the “negative” sports and war metaphors that are pervasive in discussions about the issue.

Regenerative Organic Certification Launched in US

A new organic certification programme has been launched in the US, aimed at improving fairness for farmers and workers, as well as addressing animal welfare and ecological land management. Launched at last week’s Natural Products Expo West show in California by the Regenerative Organic Alliance, the Regenerative Organic Certified (ROC) is a holistic agriculture certification encompassing “robust, high-bar standards”.

Note to USDA: The Time for Regenerative Agriculture Is Now

“How can agriculture be sustainable if we tolerate a net loss of its foundational resource?” Coupled with the fact that our nation has lost an alarming amount of top soil in the past 100 years, shouldn’t we move beyond sustainable agriculture to regenerative agriculture, especially if it can be done profitably and productively?

Chris Kerston About Building the World’s First Regenerative Wool Supply Chain

Chris Kerston is the Market Engagement and Public Outreach at the Savory Institute. In this episode, Chris introduces us to Allan Savory and the work of the Savory Institute. Chris explains how desertification happens and what role sheep and wool play to reverse desertification. You also get to learn details about the Land to Market certification scheme Chris and his team are working on to build a regenerative supply chain.

This Revolution Will Be Farmed

Nathan Kleinman is co-founder of the Experimental Farm Network (EFN), an open-source seed company, with about 80 hardy varietals currently for sale on its website. More broadly, it’s a sustainable farming community with a mission to identify and breed carbon-sequestering perennials, relying for labor on a volunteer army of experienced and newbie agriculturists across the country.

Nature Can Reduce Pesticide Use, Environment Impact

Farmers around the world are turning to nature to help them reduce pesticide use, environmental impact and, subsequently, and in some cases, increasing yields.

What Does the New Regenerative Organic Certification Mean for the Future of Good Food?

Organic is not enough. Or that’s the thinking behind the new Regenerative Organic Certification (ROC) that was officially launched at the Natural Products Expo West trade show last week. The Regenerative Organic Alliance, a coalition of organizations and businesses led by the Rodale Institute, Patagonia, and Dr. Bronner’s, have joined the seemingly unstoppable engine propelling sustainable agriculture beyond the term “organic,” or, as some believe, bringing it back to its original meaning.

The Crop of the Future

Whether you call it global warming or climate change, the emotionally charged topic generally associated with greenhouse gases brings an array of reactions – from genuine concern to belief in a conspiracy. Earth’s average surface temperature has increased 1.3ºF. over the past century and is projected to increase by an additional 3.2ºF. to 7.2ºF. over the 21st century. It is happening at a faster rate than ever before.

Regenerative Certification Meant Add to USDA Organic, Not Supplant It, Developers Say

A new Regenerative Organic Certification program launching this week at Expo West is a meaningful extension of the base USDA Organic certification rather than a symptom of the tensions within the movement, proponents say. However, some observers have taken a wait and see attitude about whether the idea has legs.

Plans Take Shape for Regeneration Midwest

Last month, Regeneration International and our partner organizations hosted a meeting at the MOSES Organic Farming Conference in La Crosse, Wisconsin, to gauge interest in forming a 12-state Regeneration Midwest Alliance in the heart of America’s “breadbasket.”

Rodale Institute to Launch Much-Anticipated Regenerative Organic Label

The Rodale Institute plans to unveil its new Regenerative Organic Certification (ROC) at this week’s Natural Products Expo West trade show in Anaheim, California. ROC was developed by the Regenerative Organic Alliance, a coalition of organizations and businesses led by the Rodale Institute and spearheaded by brands like Patagonia and Dr. Bronner’s.

A Secret Superpower, Right in Your Backyard

Backyard soils can lock in more planet-warming carbon emissions than soils found in native grasslands or urban forests like arboretums, according to Carly Ziter, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Regeneration Project Granada – a New Approach to Migration

I am part of a group of 12 people living in the village of Saleres, Valle de Lecrín, close to Granada in Spain. We are a diverse group from a variety of countries.What brings us together is a common willingness to co-create (and practice) a shared vision around three core values; integration, sustainability, regeneration.

Regenerating Soil Can Double Corn Farmers’ Incomes

Farming sustainably isn’t just good for the planet: if it’s done right it can double profits too, finds a new study published in PeerJ. But this requires a paradigm shift that champions crop diversity over monoculture, and quality over quantity–a way of growing food that’s known as ‘regenerative agriculture’.

Regenerative Farming Starts Here—with Chickens

As the makers of this video explain, “the path to healing our food and agriculture system is a path walked on by chickens.” That’s right. Main Street Project has developed a poultry-centered regenerative agriculture system that can change how food is produced around the world.

‘The Dirt Cure:’ Why Human Health Depends on Soil Health

Our connection to nature is sacred, dating back to the beginning of our existence. It’s no wonder then that our health is intimately intertwined with the Earth—from the soil beneath our feet, to the food we eat, to the water we drink and to the air that fills our lungs. In other words, nature determines our health, upon which much of our wellbeing—and even our happiness—depends.

Peter Byck – ‘The Power of Being Heard’

In our first episode of Designers of Paradise host Erik van Lennep talks with filmmaker and storyteller Peter Byck. Peter is associated with both the Schools of Sustainability and Journalism at Arizona State University. He released Carbon Nation in 2010 and has since produced a series of short documentaries exploring the impact of adaptive multi-paddock grazing on farms and ranches called Soil Carbon Cowboys.

Restoring Coral Reefs Is Possible and Surprisingly Fast

Coral reefs make up less than one-quarter of 1 percent of the Earth’s surface, yet supply resources worth an estimated $375 billion annually. Biorock shows promise for restoring reefs; it starts with metal structures that are planted into the reef.

Conservation-Minded Purchasing: How Clothing Purchases Help Get Conservation on the Ground

What if, before you purchased a hat or sweater, you knew the wool used to make it came from sheep raised on a ranch managed to improve soil health and increase soil carbon?

Impacts of Soil Carbon Sequestration on Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Midwestern USA Beef Finishing Systems

On-farm beef production and emissions data are combined with 4-year soil C analysis. Feedlot production produces lower emissions than adaptive multi-paddock grazing. Adaptive multi-paddock grazing can sequester large amounts of soil C. Emissions from the grazing system were offset completely by soil C sequestration. Soil C sequestration from well-managed grazing may help to mitigate climate change.

Video: Regenerative Agriculture — A Solution to Climate Change

What if we could reverse global warming with just one methodological shift? Can the way we farm radically impact not just our output but also overwhelming wide-ranging concerns for our environment, hunger, and poverty? Ben Dobson has a unique, personal perspective on how we can make universal changes.

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Going Beyond ‘Sustainable’ with Regenerative Farming

Sustainable often pops up in marketing to describe how products are made or packaged, and while consumers increasingly buy these products at a premium, some in the natural products industry fear the concept is becoming greenwashed while others say the term – even in its purest form – doesn’t go far enough.

Natural Products Expo West Trend Preview: Regenerative Ag

The conversations to have, education sessions to attend and products to see at Natural Products Expo West to get the full view of this macro trend.

No-Till Farmers’ Push for Healthy Soils Ignites a Movement in the Plains

As the world begins to zero in on the need to bring this soil back to life, farmers practicing no-till in the middle of the country could play a key role. As they reshape their operations with a focus on things like earthworms and water filtration, and practice a suite of other approaches that fit loosely under the umbrella of “regenerative agriculture,” these farmers are stepping out of the ag mainstream.

Earth Talk: Regenerative Agriculture

Regenerative Agriculture (RA) describes farming and grazing practices that help reverse climate change by rebuilding the organic matter in soil and restoring degraded soil biodiversity.

You Can Change Your Soil

After 25 years of experimenting with cover crop mixes and tillage practices, Gabe Brown has a simple message for those who would like to put their farms or ranches on a more sustainable path. “You have the ability to change your soils and your operation,” he told a crowd of more than 300 Thursday at a soil health workshop in Burley. “You can do it.”

One Grain at a Time: Assam’s Rice Seed Library for Climate Resilience

Annapurna Library in Assam is one with a difference. Instead of books it stores seeds of traditional rice varieties. These traditional varieties have traits that can protect the farmers and people of Assam from the impact of climate change on food security. Assam has high vulnerability to climate change, so these seeds are of high significance.

Man Who Wrote the Book on Regenerative Agriculture Says Conservation is the Fifth Ag Revolution

According to Dr. David Montgomery, author and professor at the University of Washington who spoke to farmers during the 22nd Annual No-Till on the Plains Winter Conference, our soils around the world have been severely degraded due to conventional agricultural practices. In a recent interview with Radio Oklahoma Ag Network Associate Farm Director Carson Horn, Montgomery says soil degradation has taken on two forms in modern times.

In the Gambia, Building Resilience to a Changing Climate

UN Environment will implement the largest natural resource development project in the history of The Gambia to help the West African nation tackle climate change impacts and restore degraded forests, farmland and coastal zones.

What’s the Future of Farming? It Can Only Be Agroecology, Says Farms of the Future

Think of agriculture of the future and you may conjure up images of hydroponic lettuces grown in underground, urban bunkers or massive-scale precision farming using satellites and drones. But for campaign group Farms of the Future, the future is, and can only be, agroecology.

Agroecology to the Rescue: 7 Ways Ecologists are Working Toward Healthier Food Systems

A lot has been written about agroecology, and a new special issue of the journal Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems takes it to the next level. It expands the conversation by outlining recent progress in ecology relevant for tackling food system challenges ranging from disappearing diversity to water woes to climate catastrophes.

Consumers Paying for ‘Fair Treatment of Workers, Animals, and Land’

Jeff Moyer is the Executive Director of Rodale Institute, an independent research institute for organic farming. For decades, Moyer has helped develop new techniques and invent new tools to support organic methods. Food Tank had the opportunity to talk with Jeff Moyer about organic farming and the future of agriculture.

Drought-Stricken Texans Turn to Cows to Save Their Farms

Cattle rancher Jon Taggart of Grandview, Texas, continued run his business through a drought by planting diverse grasses for his cows. That diversity of grass has kept Taggart’s soil healthy even as Texas faces droughts. The grasses ability to hold on to water when it rains has helped keep his farm healthy.

Changing Weather Patterns Throwing Ecosystems Out of Whack

Species’ lifecycles are slowly growing out of alignment, which can affect the functioning of ecosystems, ultimately impacting human food supply and disease.

Could Soils Help Save the Climate?

Soils are a double-edged climate sword. They are huge reservoirs of organic carbon and can act as a carbon sink. But they can also release CO2 into the atmosphere when used unsustainably.

This New Denim Label Is Paving the Way for Sustainable Fashion in Copenhagen

While the word “organic” has become commonplace in American dialogue, surprisingly, it’s a relatively up-and-coming stamp of approval in Denmark. The city of Copenhagen is suddenly bursting with new organic restaurants, skincare companies, and now, fashion labels. One such brand leading the charge is Blanche, a new line of eco-conscious denim that was launched in August 2017 by fashion natives Mette Fredin and Melissa Bech.

Connecting Through Food

A greater profile for the wide-ranging benefits of regenerative agriculture is what a Stanley woman hopes will flow from her recognition in a national awards program. Jade Miles has been announced as one of three finalists in the Victorian Rural Women’s Award. The award is part of a wider program, with the Victorian winner to be named at Melbourne Museum on March 20 going on to the national award ceremony in Canberra in September.

Healthy Soil and Regenerative Farming as Major Food System Solutions

Food Tank spoke with Lauren Tucker, Executive Director of Kiss the Ground, about the importance of soil health, regenerative farming, and how consumer knowledge of our food system can help solve environmental and human health crises.

Corporations Need Nature’s Regenerative Service

Many people do not perceive the value of wilderness areas, even though we receive life-sustaining services from them every day. These services include natural cycles that we take for granted such as climate regulation, water purification and maintaining biodiversity.

Agroforestry Systems May Play Vital Role in Mitigating Climate Change

Agroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, according to Penn State researchers.

Care What You Wear — Fixing Fast Fashion

Estimates suggest the fashion industry is the fifth-most polluting industry in the world. The newly released report, “A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future,” created by the Circular Fibres Initiative, presents a new model for the clothing industry that would reduce its negative impact.

Stop Buying ‘Fake’ Beef

In a lawsuit filed against the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), ranch groups and cattle producers allege that millions of pounds of imported beef are being labeled as “Products of the USA”. The USDA has argued that imported beef can be labeled as U.S. beef if it comes from a country with food safety standards that are equivalent to those in the U.S.

In Ethiopia’s Wheat Diversity, the Seeds of a Wheat Rust Solution

Today, in order to combat Ug99 and other pathogens, Ethiopian breeders take advantage of diverse genes. The old varieties are an important source for new genes, because genes can’t be produced from scratch. In a constantly changing world, where pathogens adapt and other environmental conditions keep changing, a diverse gene pool for breeders to draw from is often the best insurance for the future.

Baby Steps – Profile in Soil Health

Soil conservation is nothing new to the Lakey’s. Through the years, they have tried to implement the best conservation techniques of the time. “I started to realize that what I was seeing and treating on the cropland were merely symptoms, and they weren’t addressing the real problem,” they said.

Biodynamics: Where Regenerative Agriculture Meets Regenerative Capital

Biodynamic farming, a “beyond organic” approach to agriculture long respected in Europe, may finally be poised for a breakthrough in the U.S. Biodynamics is a natural path to regenerative agriculture—a real corrective to the negative effects of our dominant food system. Realizing the potential of biodynamics, however, will require an investment strategy that is also regenerative.

Farmland Could Be Used to Sustainably Offset America’s Entire Carbon Footprint—If the Will Exists

Positive agricultural interventions could achieve up to 6% of reduction emissions needed to achieve the Paris Agreement goals—showing that this sector is not only part of the problem, but part of the solution to climate change.

Regenerative Movement Emerging in Uruguayan Pampas

A grasslands and livestock heaven, the Pampas of Argentina and Uruguay have always been a key economic driver of these countries. With this invaluable gift of nature comes a culture of deep connection to and knowledge of the land and its plants and animals, as well as unmatched land and livestock management skills of gauchos, landowners, and scientists.

EverGreen Agriculture: A Solution for Degraded Landscapes

Widespread land degradation is an increasing threat to ecosystem health, food production systems and livelihoods across sub-Saharan Africa. The good news is that affected countries now take this fundamental problem increasingly seriously. But on the ground, the need to do something is immense – something recognized by donors.

Why Healthy Humans and Ecosystems Need Healthy Soil

The project Agricultural Production in Recovered Areas After Coal Mining in Brazil assesses whether land that has been degraded by coal mining in southern Brazil is suitable for the production of safe and nutritious food. Their ongoing research at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil, uses plant microorganisms and soil microbes to monitor and aid the recovery of degraded lands.

Turning Appalachia’s Mountaintop Coal Mines Into Farms

Refresh Appalachia is a social enterprise that partners with Reclaim Appalachia to convert post-mine lands into productive and profitable agriculture and forestry enterprises that could be scaled up to put significant numbers of people in layoff-riddled Appalachia back to work. When Refresh Appalachia launched in 2015, West Virginia had the lowest workforce participation rate in the nation.

A New Weapon in the Carbon Fight

There has been a renewed interest in understanding how soils can serve as a sink for carbon dioxide since atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have crossed 410 parts per million and oceans are already turning acidic. Besides, increasing soil carbon offers a range of co-benefits and this would buy us time before other technologies can help us transition to a zero-carbon lifestyle.

Will 'Climate Smart Agriculture' Serve the Public Interest – Or the Drive for Growing Profits for Private Corporations?

‘Climate smart agriculture’ has become the buzz phrase at high level international policy discussions. But now there is a struggle over its definition. Is it the latest manifestation for corporate social responsibility or the title of a manifesto for real, grassroots led, change, ask PETER NEWELL, JENNIFER CLAPP and ZOE BRENT

Where the Natural Products Industry Goes, So Goes the Mainstream

Lara Dickinson is the Co-Founding Director of One Step Closer to an Organic Sustainable Community (OSC2) and Cofounder of the Climate Collaborative. She applies over 20 years of consumer packaged goods marketing, sales, and management experience to helping healthy product innovations grow in natural and mass markets.

Can Agriculture and the Climate Fix Their 'Unhappy Marriage' in 2018?

Agriculture is responsible for more than three-quarters of global deforestation, and if the trend continues, about 10 million square km of land will likely be cleared by 2050. A 2016 report from the FAO said it would be possible to increase food security while maintaining or increasing forest cover, identifying 22 countries that have managed to do so. To duplicate such practices, especially in the developing world, will require sharing of knowledge.

'A Low-Carbon Livestock Sector is Possible', Says UN Chief

The head of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has called for sustainable, low-carbon practices to be built into the developing world’s growing livestock sector.

Kuli Kuli: A Superstar of Superfoods

Kuli Kuli partners with three co-manufacturers and over 1,000 farmers across more than 40 farms. It employs nine fulltime staff members in Oakland and a large part-time field team, including more than 20 people who are in charge of product demonstrations and 30 or so sales representatives.

How California Farmers can Conserve Water and Combat Climate Change

California is a global leader on climate change. Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders miss no opportunity to remind the world of our model. The state has an ambitious greenhouse gas reduction target and many climate change programs to achieve those goals.

How California’s Fires Are Linked to Climate Chaos, Soil Health and Food Choices

As we rebuild and move forward from the devastating fires, a new question is emerging. Will Californians begin to understand the connection between climate chaos—with its ongoing drought, searing temperatures and vulnerability to fires—and industrial agriculture—the world’s leading cause of climate change?

Biodiversity for Resilience Against Natural Disasters

Climate change is increasingly putting pressure on farmers and the global food systems. Groups are highlighting the importance of resilience—an ecosystem’s capacity to resist or recover from stress, shocks, and disturbances—for the security and productivity of the world’s food and farming systems in the face of climate change.

How To Be a Better, Smarter, Happier Meat Eater

Sure, you’ve heard that red meat is cruel and unsustainable, and that it’ll destroy the environment if it doesn’t give us all heart attacks first. But it’s so delicious! Which is why we begged Mark Bittman to reconcile our principles with our appetites—and teach us the new rules of red meat.

Let’s Wrench Power Back from the Billionaires

Here is where we are as a planet in 2018: after all of the wars, revolutions and international summits of the past 100 years, we live in a world where a tiny handful of incredibly wealthy individuals exercise disproportionate levels of control over the economic and political life of the global community.

Let's Wrench Power Back from the Billionaires

Here is where we are as a planet in 2018: after all of the wars, revolutions and international summits of the past 100 years, we live in a world where a tiny handful of incredibly wealthy individuals exercise disproportionate levels of control over the economic and political life of the global community.

Solar Greenhouses Generate Electricity and Grow Healthy Crops

The first crops of tomatoes and cucumbers grown inside electricity-generating solar greenhouses were as healthy as those raised in conventional greenhouses, signaling that “smart” greenhouses hold great promise for dual-use farming and renewable electricity production.

Mexico’s Prickly Pear Cactus: Energy Source of the Future?

The prickly pear cactus is such a powerful symbol in Mexico that they put it smack in the middle of the national flag. It was considered sacred by the ancient Aztecs, and modern-day Mexicans eat it, drink it, and even use it in medicines and shampoos. Now scientists have come up with a new use for the bright green plant: producing renewable energy.

Mexico's Prickly Pear Cactus: Energy Source of the Future?

The prickly pear cactus is such a powerful symbol in Mexico that they put it smack in the middle of the national flag. It was considered sacred by the ancient Aztecs, and modern-day Mexicans eat it, drink it, and even use it in medicines and shampoos. Now scientists have come up with a new use for the bright green plant: producing renewable energy.

Video: Soil Organic Carbon: Keystone to Sustainability in a Changing World


Changing Paradigms in Food and Farming — Part 1

Our world is in a bit of an uproar these days. Never before have we seen so many challenges come to the fore simultaneously. Here in Vermont, we are very fortunate to live in a rather civil society, especially when we consider the toxic political environment that we see on the national level. We still have plenty to worry about right here in our own state, however.

Why Urban Farming Is Key in the Fight Against Hunger and Climate Change

The urban farms sprouting up and across cities around the world aren’t just feeding mouths—they are “critical to survival” and a “necessary adaptation” for developing regions and a changing climate, according to a new study.

Master Gardeners: Making a Difference in Climate Change

There are two ways to reduce the environmental damage done by fossil fuels. The most common way is to reduce the use of fossil fuels — by driving a hybrid or electric car, for example, or using solar or wind power. The second way, carbon sequestration, involves pulling carbon out of the air and storing it in the ground.

NASA Langley Scientist Touts Biochar: An ‘Environmental Superstar’

Over many centuries, primitive peoples plowed biochar into farm fields, turning poor soil into rich cropland. Now, it could help reverse global warming. That’s because an added benefit of carbon-packed biochar is that, by plowing it into farm fields, it removes the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide indefinitely from the carbon cycle.

NASA Langley Scientist Touts Biochar: An 'Environmental Superstar'

Over many centuries, primitive peoples plowed biochar into farm fields, turning poor soil into rich cropland. Now, it could help reverse global warming. That’s because an added benefit of carbon-packed biochar is that, by plowing it into farm fields, it removes the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide indefinitely from the carbon cycle.

Climate Scientists Unlock Secrets of ‘Blue Carbon’

Tidal wetlands come in many forms, but they could be more alike below the surface than anyone realized. Whether it’s a mangrove forest in Florida, a freshwater swamp in Virginia or a saltwater marsh in Oregon, the amount of carbon locked in a soil sample from each of these coastal ecosystems is roughly the same. That’s the surprising message from a new analysis of some 1,900 soil cores collected around the United States during the past few decades.

Our Best Environment Stories of 2017

From soil to algae and fish to flowers, food and the environment are entwined; here are some of Civil Eats’ top stories exploring the connection.

Responding To Climate Change Through Community Involvement

Adaptation of climate resilient practices is very crucial. It allowed communities to start getting direct benefits. There is an urgent need to scale up pilot projects at a mass level to have wider impact on the environment. These interventions have been proved successful by the acceptance of the society and can be replicated on mass scale.

Framework Agreement on Climate Change Reached at COP23 Climate Negotiations

For the first time in the 25-year history of international climate negotiations, the 197 member countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have reached an agreement on agriculture. The milestone came near the close of the 23rd Conference of Parties (COP23) of the UNFCCC and formally establishes a process called the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture.

Fire Ecology’s Lessons for a More Resilient Future

There is no silver lining to a fire like those that struck Sonoma and Napa counties in October, or the still-burning Thomas Fire in Southern California. But for people like Willie and Erik Ohlsen, the North Bay fires are a wake-up call, a chance to proactively address the way the plants and animals of Northern California have co-evolved with fire—and to rebuild these communities with fire in mind.

Grocery Store Program Improves Farmers’ Adoption of Environmental Practices

In one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.

Grocery Store Program Improves Farmers' Adoption of Environmental Practices

In one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.

Cocoa Farming: The Key to Reversing Deforestation in West Africa

Agroforestry, coupled with community-led cooperative models of organizing and farmer-to-farmer training, can quickly and effectively be scaled up and out to reverse deforestation and regenerate soil health in West Africa and other parts of the world.

Meet Ken Greene: A Book Worm With a Green Thumb…and a Passion for Seed Preservation

Ken Greene began offering seeds for loan at the Gardiner library. Patrons could choose heirloom and organic seeds to grow at home, and at the end of the season, they saved seeds and returned some to the library. “That’s how libraries work,” he says. “You bring back the story, the information, whatever you took out, to share with the community. In this case, it was seeds.”

How a Grain and Legume Farmer Harvests Nutrition from the Soil

What sets Larry Kandarian apart is his approach to growing food. Instead of deeply plowing the land and mixing in sheets of fertilizers to ensure high yields like most farmers in America, Kandarian employs a minimal-tillage system and uses absolutely no fertilizers or compost. And it’s working.

Local View: Ode to the Cow: Cattle as Climate Champions

Only in America could we have designed a set of government incentives that simultaneously mine the only soil we have and pollute the water with synthetic fertilizer on one end and manure on the other — all of it mixed with a strong whiff of small-farm bankruptcy, animal misery, and climate change.

Harvest Carbon from the Air

The stable storage of this carbon below ground not only builds soil organic matter and improves future crops but also, like a pressure valve, relieves the atmospheric carbon buildup.

Forest Gardening with Space and Place for Wild Elephants

In my vision of “Regeneration,” I believe we need to heal the divide between humans and non-humans, and that humans can be stewards of lush gardens that provide valuable yields for humans and food and habitat for other living beings.

Unexpectedly Large Impact of Forest Management and Grazing on Global Vegetation Biomass

Carbon stocks in vegetation have a key role in the climate system. However, the magnitude, patterns and uncertainties of carbon stocks and the effect of land use on the stocks remain poorly quantified. Here we show, using state-of-the-art datasets, that vegetation currently stores around 450 petagrams of carbon.

Video: 50 Years Ago, This Was a Wasteland. He Changed Everything | Short Film Showcase

Almost 50 years ago, fried chicken tycoon David Bamberger used his fortune to purchase 5,500 acres of overgrazed land in the Texas Hill Country. Planting grasses to soak in rains and fill hillside aquifers, Bamberger devoted the rest of his life to restoring the degraded landscape. Today, the land has been restored to its original habitat and boasts enormous biodiversity. Bamberger’s model of land stewardship is now being replicated across the region and he is considered to be a visionary in land management and water conservation.

Video: 50 Years Ago, This Was a Wasteland. He Changed Everything | Short Film Showcase

Almost 50 years ago, fried chicken tycoon David Bamberger used his fortune to purchase 5,500 acres of overgrazed land in the Texas Hill Country. Planting grasses to soak in rains and fill hillside aquifers, Bamberger devoted the rest of his life to restoring the degraded landscape. Today, the land has been restored to its original habitat and boasts enormous biodiversity. Bamberger’s model of land stewardship is now being replicated across the region and he is considered to be a visionary in land management and water conservation.

At the Market: Healing People and the Planet

Marcus McCauley comes to his passion for healing naturally. “You need to nurture the soil if you want it to grow healthy plants and vegetables,” he says. In 2012 his family sold its ranch in Oklahoma and moved to Colorado in a quest for healing — for him, his family and his community.

Let’s Make 2018 the Year We Rise Up and Regenerate!

The future of the Regeneration Movement depends on all of us. Will we rise to the occasion?

Let's Make 2018 the Year We Rise Up and Regenerate!

The future of the Regeneration Movement depends on all of us. Will we rise to the occasion?

In a Hard Year for Sustainability, Here Are Some of the Bright Spots for 2017

When it comes to protecting the planet and fighting to turn back the ticking clock on climate change, 2017 has not been pretty. In fact, if we listed everything that happened that will likely harm the environment, you’d get depressed. But around Maine in the course of this year, there were many positive actions and events in the world of sustainability.

ND Farmer Stresses Importance of Regenerative Agriculture

“We’re our worst enemy, not allowing nature to function,” Gabe Brown said. “…We cannot have ecological integrity without human integrity. All of us need to look in the mirror and realize that our management decisions that we make every day on our operation affect thousands of people, really hundreds of thousands of people. Because they’re affecting the mineral cycle, the water cycle, the nutrient cycle.”

Sustainable Agriculture Is Not Enough; We Need Regenerative Agriculture

“Despite all our achievements, we owe our existence to a six-inch layer of topsoil and the fact that it rains,” says the farm equipment association of Minnesota and South Dakota.

How Food Survives Extreme Weather Events

Who wouldn’t agree? 2017 was a year of mind-blowing events. We won’t even try to address the politics here. Instead we’ll take a look at a (heretofore) safe subject: The weather. Specifically, what several natural disasters meant for our food supply.

“Cuatro por 1000”: Preguntas Apremiantes

Autor: Ronnie Cummins | Publicado: Octubre, 2017  Pregunta Uno: ¿Qué es la Iniciativa “Cuatro por 1000: Suelos por la Seguridad Alimentaria y Clima” lanzada por el gobierno francés en la Cumbre Climática de París en diciembre de 2015? Respuesta: “Cuatro por 1000: Suelos por la Seguridad Alimentaria y Clima” es un plan global y acuerdo […]

How You Can Help Fix the Global Water Crisis

Sandra Postel, director of the Global Water Policy Project and former National Geographic Society Freshwater Fellow, demystifies humanity’s obsession with water in her new book Replenish. When National Geographic caught up with her in New Mexico, she explained how people are coming up with innovative ways to conserve water before we run dry.

How to Feed Ourselves in a Time of Climate Crisis

Changing the food system is the most important thing humans can do to fix our broken carbon cycles. Meanwhile, food security is all about adaptation when you’re dealing with crazy weather and shifting growing zones. How can a world of 7 billion—and growing—feed itself? Here are 13 of the best ideas for a just and sustainable food system.

The Year in Food Policy

It was a tumultuous year for food policy in the United States. Here’s a rundown of several of the most important food policy changes that took place in 2017

The Production of Indigo Dye from Plants

This report presents a study of the technical, environmental, and economic factors involved in indigo dye production from Persicaria tinctoria, with the aim to support increased farm-scale indigo production in the Northern California fibershed and beyond.

Already Shopping Organic? This Is the Next Step

According to Josh Tickell, the solution to climate change is right under our noses. Or more specifically, right under our feet. In his new book, Kiss the Ground, the producer, author, and environmentalist dives into the potential and promise of regenerative agriculture—a farming practice that renews the health of soil so that it can actually absorb carbon from the atmosphere.

Video: ‘Growing Organic: NRCS: Pasture Management’

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service helps America’s farmers and ranchers conserve the nation’s soil, water, air and other natural resources. All programs are voluntary and offer science-based solutions that benefit both the landowner and the environment.

Growing Value for Wool Growers

American wool is typically a low-value commodity. The prices many wool producers realize barely cover their costs to pay shearers to remove the wool. At the same time, consumer demand for natural fibers and ethically, locally, and domestically produced goods is on the rise. This feasibility study sought to identify finished products and programs that might increase the value of wool, and thus revenue to Northern California wool producers.

Kenyan Farmers Reap Economic, Environmental Gains from ABCDs of Agroforestry

In Kenya’s Rift Valley, rural communities are implementing agroforestry to respond to new challenges brought by climate change.

Scaling-Up Investment into Land Restoration: Getting the Biggest Bang for the Buck

Land degradation has long been recognized as a major problem which threatens ecological health, social stability and economic prosperity. For several decades, a series of solutions have been devised and attempted with varying degrees of success. However, efforts to combat land degradation have been hampered by a lack of resources and the sheer scale of the problem.

Regenerative Wool Shaking Up the Textile Industry

When the sheep are managed properly they can play an amazing role in sequestering carbon, restoring watersheds, restoring wildlife habitat and reversing climate change. Savory’s ecological outcome verification is quantifying that positive impact across landscapes and helping brands access wool from lands that are verifiably regenerating.

Farm to Shampoo: Organic Apples and Offsetting Carbon Emissions

Regeneration Canada, DocTerre, Oneka, and Propagate Ventures have teamed up to plant an organic apple orchard that will offset the carbon footprint of the Living Soils Symposium Montreal.

Regenerative Grape Growers and Wine Producers

Healthy soils produce healthy crops, require little if any fertilization, support a healthy community of bacteria, and retain water, requiring little if any irrigation. As far as grape growing and wine making is concerned, healthier soil yields stronger, healthier grape vines that produce higher quality grapes, increased yield, and perhaps most important of all, grapes that express the “terroir” of the land much more than normal.

Bison: The Latest in Carbon Capture Tech

For the past 30 years, 777 Bison Ranch has employed grazing methods that Hillenbrand says is helping save the native grasslands, replace lost topsoil and aid in the fight against global warming.

‘New Year, New Horizons’, Savory’s Land to Market Program

The New Year will require us to shift our gaze upward and outward, as we invite the commercial world to participate in the regeneration of landscapes through the Land to Market program, the world’s first verified regenerative supply chain.

Regenerative Wool Shaking Up the Textile Industry

When wool is processed correctly it is an outstanding material, one that cannot really be rivaled in performance by any other fabric.

Agroforestry Should Play a Bigger Role in Tackling Climate Change

Never has it been so pressing to address climate change. So let’s hurry to embrace a proven part of the solution. The radical (but not new) concept of agroforestry – be it integrating trees to create shade over coffee bushes, adding trees to Colombian cattle ranches, or managing and encouraging shea trees to flourish amid millet crops in the Sahel – must move to centre stage.

Explaining Extreme Events from a Climate Perspective

This sixth edition of explaining extreme events of the previous year (2016) from a climate perspective is the first of these reports to find that some extreme events were not possible in a preindustrial climate.

Soil Superheroes in Children’s Book

Mighty Mini Microbe is smaller than the average superhero. That’s because she represents the billions of tiny soil microbes that play an integral role in soil health. Mighty Mini talks about her adventures in a 24-page children’s/coloring book combo produced by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Filmmaker Diana Rodgers and the Better Meat Movement

Diana Rodgers believes in the nutritional and environmental benefits of well-managed, grass-fed cattle. In her new film Kale vs. Cow: The Case for Better Meat, she questions whether a healthy, sustainable, and conscientious food system can exist without animals.

Soil Acidification Is an Awaking Giant Close to Home

The threat of soil acidity is like an unseen sleeping giant who is only now being awakened. Soon enough, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to undo what was done. It turns out that particularly ammonic-based nitrogen fertilizers are both plant food and soil poison.

Video: ‘Salvation Is In Soil’ TEDxDirigo by Florence Reed

Climate change got you down? We understand. Why not lift yourself up with this brand new TEDx talk from our Founder and Director of Strategic Growth, Florence Reed?

Where Corn Is King, the Stirrings of a Renaissance in Small Grains

Breaking with the industrial model of growing corn and soybeans, a growing number of Iowa farmers are putting oats, rye, and other small grains into their crop rotation, a switch that is regenerating soils, cleaning up waters, and providing benefits to family farms.

Reclaiming Appalachia: A Push to Bring Back Native Forests to Coal Country

Previous efforts to restore former coal mine sites in Appalachia have left behind vast swaths of unproductive land. Now, a group of nonprofits and scientists are working to restore native trees to the region — even if it means starting the reclamation process from scratch.

Changing Consumers Ignite Food Revolution

Much of the food industry has rallied around the idea of “sustainability,” which in the most precise definition refers to the ability of a food system to last over time. With sales of the packaged food staples that dominate American grocery aisles stagnant or sinking, the food industry has no choice but to adapt. Many of the changes start with how individual farmers treat the earth itself.

Fast-Fashion’s Environmentally Destructive Habits

A recent study from the Ellen Macarthur Foundation illuminates the incomprehensible toll fashion takes on the climate. Done in collaboration with animal-welfare advocate and high-end clothing designer Stella McCartney, the Macarthur study tracks the environmental devastations incurred through the production of next season’s wares.

New Healthy Soil Guide Gives Cooks a Better Recipe for Climate Change

Diana Donlon, director of the Center for Food Safety (CFS)’s Soil Solutions program, spoke with Anthony Myint and Karen Leibowitz, owners of The Perennial Restaurant in San Francisco. The team is launching a Healthy Soil Guide for chefs and home cooks about they can play in promoting healthy soils and climate solutions.

Healthy Soils Program: Diversity of Farms Awarded, Cover Crops and Compost Most Popular Practices

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) announced its first round of grants for the Healthy Soils Program last week. In our first blogpost about the awards, we shared a summary of the awards by project type (incentives versus demonstration) and a breakdown of the awards by county.

Local Food Video Series: Diverse Approaches to Common Challenges

In the summer of 2017, I set out on a road trip filming a documentary series on North American local food initiatives. During this journey, I had the privilege of meeting dozens of farmers who shared an inspiring and diverse vision for the future of North American food. Beginning in November 2017, each of their stories will be presented as a component of a 10-part series entitled The Food Less Traveled.

Are Your Favorite Jeans Part of the Climate Problem?

Denim and clothing companies will do all that they can to fudge the link between their brands and the realities of greenhouse gas emissions. According to reports from the Carbon Disclosure Project, companies within the fashion sector might be ignoring as much as 90 percent of the climate pollution they generate.

How Does Organic Mitigate Climate Change? Webinar

New research by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL) shows that organic agriculture can help mitigate climate change. The study examined 19 studies from around the world to determine levels of greenhouse gasses emitted by organic versus conventional farms.

New Research: Synthetic Nitrogen Destroys Soil Carbon, Undermines Soil Health

New research shows synthetic nitrogen fertilizer stimulates soil microbes, which feast on organic matter. Over time, the impact of this enhanced microbial appetite outweighs the benefits of more crop residues, and thus, the net effect of synthetic nitrogen use is to reduce soil’s organic matter content.

Nigeria Pledges to Restore Nearly 10 Million Acres of Degraded Land

The government of Nigeria has announced its plans to restore four million hectares, or nearly 10 million acres, of degraded lands within its borders. The restoration of degraded forests and other landscapes was found to have the most climate mitigation potential of 20 natural climate strategies examined for a recent study.

Pledge for Poison Free Food and Farming

We are creating a network of poison free organic zones that rejuvenate biodiversity, the soil and water, that create climate resilience and climate stability, that protect the health and well being of our children and the heirs of all species. Through poison free food and farming, we sow the seeds for a brighter future and the future of all beings on our living, vibrant and generous Earth.

Dirt Shirts and SITO: Promoting Organic Apparel and Eco-Friendly Fashion

The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification is the platinum standard for organic apparel, tracking the cotton from farm to final packaging through every step of the supply chain.

Can McDonald’s Help Solve Climate Change?

For more than four years, McDonald’s has been traversing a long and arduous path to produce “sustainable beef” in its sprawling global supply chain. Now, it’s looking for solutions right under its feet.

A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future

Fashion is a vibrant industry that employs hundreds of millions, generates significant revenues, and touches almost everyone, everywhere. Since the 20th century, clothing has increasingly been considered as disposable, and the industry has become highly globalised, with garments often designed in one country, manufactured in another and sold worldwide at an ever-increasing pace.

Sikkim: An Organic Vision Becomes Reality

The former kingdom of Sikkim (from 1643-1975) is now an Indian state with a “glorious history of agriculture where people and nature lived in perfect harmony.“

When Climate Change Makes It Hard to Breathe

Climate change isn’t just contributing to drought, super-storms, sea level rise and flooding. It’s also making it harder for many people to breathe, like 13-year-old Estefany Velasquez. Her family faced a tough choice because of her asthma.

Experiencing a Healthy Ecosystem in Spanish Altiplano

The differences in the soil in natural areas in comparison to ploughed, farmed fields is stark. Farmed soil is very pale, a sign that there is barely any carbon or organic matter left in it. Soil from the natural area is much darker, a sign that it is healthier. This inspired me to want to multiply the amount of space with healthy soil exponentially, something that the camps have set out to achieve.

The Ground Beneath Our Feet

We treat our soil like dirt. By growing food and storing carbon dioxide and water, the loam and peat that coats the earth sustains us all. In return, we till it, treat it with chemicals and generally walk all over it. Without healthy soil, food becomes less nutritious and crops become harder to grow. If the crops aren’t healthy, then the 70 percent of the world’s fresh water that’s used for agriculture will be wasted.

Could Young Organic Farmers Stop Climate Change?

The next generation of organic farmers doesn’t just want to grow food-they want a better food system. And they need our help.

Eating From Trees

There was a time when lots of our vegetables came from trees in our backyard or that of the neighbours. May be it is time we revisited those days. Imagine if we got our veggies from trees just like we do our fruits.

Why Fungi Rule the World

Mycorrhizal fungi also have an outsize role in the decomposition of dead plants and the release of carbon. And since Earth’s soil contains more than three times as much carbon as its atmosphere, what fungi do in the soil could dramatically affect climate change. One conclusion: humans have underestimated the humble fungi. Not Talbot. As she puts it, “Mycorrhizal fungi are running the world.”

‘Re(store) It’: Green America Launches Campaign On World Soil Day To Save The Earth … Literally

Green America today launched the Re(store) It campaign to educate the public and U.S. corporations about the benefits of regenerative agriculture, an approach to farming which uses methods that rejuvenate the soil and trap greenhouse gases.

Regenerative Agriculture Is Essential to Our Sustainability Goals

In amongst all the worrying trends and ominous signals that keep us on our toes at Forum for the Future, the potential for the world’s soils to suck up some of the excess carbon that’s currently making mischief in the atmosphere shines as a genuine ray of hope.

Geoengineering: Pseudoscience at COP23

Thousands of people in the green, blue and cyan zones of COP23 are afraid. And fear, as we know, is a bad adviser, mainly because it opens the door to those who come with magical solutions, pseudoscience, and smoke and mirrors, those who are often the ones who created the problem in the first place.

Regeneration International: Report and Lessons from COP23

Regeneration International (RI) sent a small delegation to the COP23 Climate Summit in Bonn, Germany. Read their report and takeaways from COP23.

Start Small – The Story of Bec Hellouin Permaculture Farm

Charles and Perrine Hervé-Gruyer decided to become low impact farmers in 2006. Their efforts to grow food without mechanisation or chemicals were often ridiculed in the early years. But their farm in Normandy, Bec Hellouin, is now established as the premier permaculture farm in France. It is also the source of a number of scientific studies showing that it’s possible to make a living wage by growing food using permaculture techniques on just a quarter of an acre of land.

Soil Power! The Dirty Way to a Green Planet

Carbon sequestration in soil and vegetation is an effective way to pull carbon from the atmosphere that in some ways is the opposite of geoengineering. Instead of overcoming nature, it reinforces it, promoting the propagation of plant life to return carbon to the soil that was there in the first place.