Can Big Money Fix a Broken Food System?

A growing number of investment companies in this realm are now using capital to help ranchers switch to 100 percent grass-fed beef production, connect small farms to communities with little access to fresh food, and transition farmland used to grow commodity corn and soy to organic, regenerative systems.

“There’s total momentum right now around people rethinking about how their money is being put to work,” says Kate Danaher, the senior manager of social enterprise lending and integrated capital at RSF Social Finance. “Impact investing as a whole is growing very quickly, and my guess is that if you polled everyone interested, the most popular sector is sustainable food and ag.”

Teaching Agroecology in the Himalayan Foothills

Navandya encourages a mix of ancestral and modern farming techniques through the practice of agroecology. The teaching is based on simple science and economics—farmers don’t need to bury themselves in debt to tend their crops. Healthy soils and climate-adapted, local seeds can generate adequate yields and well-fed children. Navdanya’s method isn’t anti-modern, but it is based on ancestral wisdom.

Agroecology Getting to the Root Causes of Climate Change

This issue of Farming Matters shows how the industrial food system is a main culprit when it comes to the climate crisis, and illustrates how agroecology and food sovereignty offer solutions by addressing the root causes of this crisis – political, social and environmental.

Eating Our Way to Collapse

Industrial agriculture is a hazard to the environment, and the health of people around the world. With a limited window of time, change is crucial if we want to nourish, and not just feed, people and our planet.