The Production of Indigo Dye from Plants

This report presents a study of the technical, environmental, and economic factors involved in indigo dye production from Persicaria tinctoria, with the aim to support increased farm-scale indigo production in the Northern California fibershed and beyond.

Growing Value for Wool Growers

American wool is typically a low-value commodity. The prices many wool producers realize barely cover their costs to pay shearers to remove the wool. At the same time, consumer demand for natural fibers and ethically, locally, and domestically produced goods is on the rise. This feasibility study sought to identify finished products and programs that might increase the value of wool, and thus revenue to Northern California wool producers.

Regenerative Wool Shaking Up the Textile Industry

When the sheep are managed properly they can play an amazing role in sequestering carbon, restoring watersheds, restoring wildlife habitat and reversing climate change. Savory’s ecological outcome verification is quantifying that positive impact across landscapes and helping brands access wool from lands that are verifiably regenerating.

Fast-Fashion’s Environmentally Destructive Habits

A recent study from the Ellen Macarthur Foundation illuminates the incomprehensible toll fashion takes on the climate. Done in collaboration with animal-welfare advocate and high-end clothing designer Stella McCartney, the Macarthur study tracks the environmental devastations incurred through the production of next season’s wares.

Are Your Favorite Jeans Part of the Climate Problem?

Denim and clothing companies will do all that they can to fudge the link between their brands and the realities of greenhouse gas emissions. According to reports from the Carbon Disclosure Project, companies within the fashion sector might be ignoring as much as 90 percent of the climate pollution they generate.

A New Textiles Economy: Redesigning Fashion’s Future

Fashion is a vibrant industry that employs hundreds of millions, generates significant revenues, and touches almost everyone, everywhere. Since the 20th century, clothing has increasingly been considered as disposable, and the industry has become highly globalised, with garments often designed in one country, manufactured in another and sold worldwide at an ever-increasing pace.