Entries by Regeneration International

Regenerative Agriculture Can Make Farmers Stewards of the Land Again

The experiences of farmers who have adopted regenerative agriculture show that it restores soil carbon, literally locking carbon up underground, while also reversing desertification, recharging water systems, increasing biodiversity and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. And it produces nutrient-rich food and promises to enliven rural communities and reduce corporate control of the food system.

Regenerative Agriculture

Carbon sequestration is just a side benefit of regenerative agriculture, which is all about building and maintaining healthy soil. Farmers and ranchers are turning to regenerative agriculture because it lowers costs and increases productivity.

How Regenerative Agriculture ‘Supplements’ Health

Pressure from consumers and regulators is changing how animal-derived supplements can be made in the United States.
Supplement brands have a new supply chain challenge to address in their GMPs (good manufacturing practices) and an interesting opportunity for investment. Curiosity will not kill this opportunity—complacency will.

Why Regenerative Agriculture Is the Future of Food

As we face an ever-growing need to combat climate change, many people around the world are looking at how we produce our food. Agriculture has a strong effect on climate change (and vice versa). While some methods contribute to higher pollution and environmental degradation, others actually have the potential to reverse climate change. And one of those practices is regenerative agriculture.

Agriculture Is a Big Climate Problem. Now Farmers Are Sharing Solutions

While agriculture is suffering the impacts of a warming world, it is also a part of the problem. As the guardians of one of the planet’s largest carbon sinks – soils – farmers have contributed around 10 to 12 percent of the manmade carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. With a view to short-term gains, many farmers have made a habit of ripping organic matter out of the soil and leaving fields bare, to prepare their fields for growing crops. This has led to a plethora of issues, including soil erosion and water runoff – and it means that, where soil could be sequestering carbon into the earth, it is instead releasing it into the atmosphere.

Revisiting a Geography of Hope

Now, in the twenty-first century, awareness is growing that we depend on farmers for more than food. We need farmers and their farmland to sequester carbon, to buffer against floods, and to provide wildlife habitat. Perhaps less evidently, we also need farms to inspire us with their beauty, to cultivate our respect and awe of the more-than-human, and to light the pathways to a more just and prosperous world.

Native Shrubs and Why They’re Essential for Carbon Sequestration

In light of the newest IPCC and US climate change reports, coupled with reports of the ongoing declines of wild species—birds, insects—you name them, just so long as they aren’t human, I have turned to thinking about shrubs. It is precisely their adaptive characteristics that give shrubs their potential to be powerful players in soil carbon sequestration and ecosystem regeneration in certain parts of the world, such as the Midwest.