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The Magic of Carbon Farming

Farmers have always been life givers, as they work to feed the millions in this planet. The service they provide of growing food for all of us is invaluable. The humble age old practice of farming has now taken on a role, that is making climate activists and scientists smile.

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Farming a Warmer Planet

The challenge for farm communities is to adapt and respond before climate change starts to erode agricultural productivity. For governments and development groups, the challenge is broader: They are recognizing that it’s not just that climate change is affecting farmers, it’s also that farmers are affecting the climate.

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Reversing Climate Change One Step at a Time

Torri Estrada, environmental scientist and co-founder of the Carbon Cycle Institute in Petaluma works with farmers to stop and reverse climate change by advancing natural, science-based solutions that remove atmospheric carbon. For the Carbon Cycle Institute, it’s all about the soil.

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3 Circular Principles for Healthy Agriculture

Proponents of the regenerative economy are realizing that it is dependent on the circular economy of soil. The soil is one of the key natural capitals on which we all depend. Its loss is our demise.

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Eating Our Way to Collapse

Industrial agriculture is a hazard to the environment, and the health of people around the world. With a limited window of time, change is crucial if we want to nourish, and not just feed, people and our planet.

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Food Security, Forests at Risk Under Trump’s USDA

U.S. food security, forest health, and the ability of farmers to respond to climate change are all at risk if President’s Trump’s pick to lead the U.S. Department of Agriculture brings climate change skepticism to the agency, agricultural researchers and environmental law experts say.

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Digging Deep Reveals the Intricate World of Roots

The bulk of a prairie grass plant, it turns out, exists out of sight, with anywhere from eight to fourteen feet of roots extending down into the earth. Why should we care? Besides being impressively large, these hidden root balls accomplish a lot—storing carbon, nourishing soil, increasing bioproductivity, and preventing erosion.